Saturday, October 20, 2012

Spotlight on Chris Ward - Excerpt

Just to tease everyone with what you're missing out on if you don't read The Tube Riders, by Chris Ward, here is a brief excerpt from Chapter 1. Just a taste of what you can expect from such an outstanding and accomplished author.

Excerpt from The Tube Riders (chap 1)

"As the others said their goodbyes and left, Marta stood for a moment, looking out across the park towards the huge elevated highway overpass that rose above the city to the south. Half finished, it arched up out of the terraces and housing blocks to the east, rising steadily to a height of five hundred feet. There, at the point where it should have begun its gradual decent to the west, it just ended, sawn off, amputated.

Years ago, she remembered her father standing here with her, telling her about the future. Things had been better then. She'd still been going to school, still believed the world was good, still had dreams about getting a good job like a lawyer or an architect and hadn't started to do the deplorable things that made her wake up shivering, just to get food or the items she needed to survive.
He had taken her hand and given it a little squeeze. She still remembered the warmth of his skin, the strength and assurance in those fingers. With his other arm he had pointed up at the overpass, in those days busy with scaffolding, cranes and ant-like construction workers, and told her how one day they would take their car, and drive right up over it and out of the city. The government was going to open up London Greater Urban Area again, he said. Let the city people out, and the people from the Greater Forest Areas back in. The smoggy, grey skies of London GUA would clear, the sirens would stop wailing all night, and people would be able to take the chains and the deadlocks off their doors. She remembered how happy she'd felt with her father's arms around her, holding her close, protecting her.

But something had happened. She didn't know everything - no one did - but things had changed. The government hadn't done any of those things. The construction stopped, the skies remained grey, and life got even worse. Riots waited around every street corner. People disappeared without warning amid tearful rumours that the Huntsmen were set to return.

Marta sighed, biting her lip. Her parents and her brother were gone. Marta was just twenty-one, but St. Cannerwells Park was the closest she would ever get to seeing the countryside, and the euphoria of tube riding was the closest she would ever get to happiness.

She gripped the fence with both hands and gritted her teeth, trying not to cry. She was tough. She had adjusted to Mega Britain's harshness, was accustomed to looking after herself, but just sometimes, life became too much to bear."

Want more? Rush out and get your copy of The Tube Riders series today!

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